Let Us Talk

September 30, 2009

Iran — What Should The World Do?

Middle East 9 09

World powers put pressure on Iran ahead of crucial nuclear talks scheduled for Thursday, amid growing concern about the covert build up of Tehran’s nuclear program.  Iran has insisted for years that it has a right to civilian nuclear energy for peaceful purposes and to make enriched fuel for power plants — although its first Russian built and long delayed nuclear plant is still not online. Iranian officials underscored that their nuclear “rights” (uranium enrichment which the UN Security Council wants suspended) were not negotiable.

But its announcement last week of the ongoing construction of another uranium enrichment plant, underground near the Shi’ite holy city of Qom, prompted stern warnings from western capitals led by Washington and concern from some Arab states.

Arab states from the Gulf have joined talks with the six Western nations preparing to negotiate with Iran over its nuclear program. The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) includes Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Envoys from the Arab states are said to have met at the United Nations headquarters in New York over the weekend with the five permanent powers (P5) in the UN Security Council plus Germany who want guarantees from Tehran on the civilian nature of its nuclear ambitions.  The ‘P5-plus-one’ group is set to meet with Iran on Thursday, October 1 in Geneva.

“It will be in the best interests of everybody that this situation stays under control,” said Sheikh Abdullah bin Zayed, the United Arab Emirates’ Minister of Foreign Affairs, following the disclosure of a secret Iranian nuclear site under development near the holy city of Qom. “The new facility is being looked at by the International Atomic Energy Agency, and it seems there will be positive co-operation with Iran for inspecting this site.”

Jeffrey Feltman, the US assistant secretary of state for Near Eastern affairs, spoke of “ongoing consultation with our Gulf friends about what is our policy toward Iran and how we are going to address the October 1 dialogue with Iran.  There’s a profound concern on their part that we do not try anything that could be construed as trading their interests for our interests.”

Iranian president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has stated he has no objection to Gulf countries directly joining the talks.

Gulf States, fearing the encroachment of Iranian power throughout the region, have urged the country’s leadership to comply with international demands regarding the development of its nuclear program.

“Nuclear weapons is a tough issue, but it’s hard to know whether all this is just talk,” Dr. Ghanim A-Najjar, a political scientist at Kuwait University, told The Media Line. “Nuclear weapons are not a joke and I don’t think Iran will go that far. They don’t have the ability; the technology is not available to them.”

Dr. A-Najjar argued that recent efforts by Gulf States to explore nuclear power were in direct response to Iran’s nuclear development. “The Gulf States want to put pressure on Iran with threats of their own nuclear energy plans.”

“But I don’t see how Gulf States can be serious about nuclear development,” he added. “There’s a big step between saying we want nuclear power to actually having it and I don’t think the Gulf States are capable of this kind of development.”

Dr. Stephen Steinbeiser, Resident Director of the American Institute for Yemeni Studies, argued that there was more concern over Iran’s overall influence in the region than the potential of a nuclear armed Iran.

“People are definitely interested in Iran, if one day it’s proven that Iran has nuclear weapons the balance of power in the Middle East really squeezes Arabs out of the middle between Iran and Israel. That’s something that makes people pause and people are starting to question just how powerful Arab states really are.”

“The Israelis have a very palpable fear of Iran,” he said. “Yemenis don’t have that but there’s a concern about the influence that Iran is presumed to yield.”

“People here are less interested in these negotiations than in what is perceived to be Iranian interference in the northern rebellion,” he said, referring to an ongoing military conflict between Yemen’s central government and a Houthi-led rebellion in the country’s North. “You never hear it in the mainstream media but locally people feel that the northern rebels are receiving Iranian support and that this is not so much a war against rebels but a war against Iranian intrusion.”

Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov said this week that Moscow would like to see “substantial progress” on the nuclear program in Geneva, days after President Dmitry Medvedev signaled he might endorse sanctions against Iran.

This is a strong indication of a change in Russia’s position and that probably has something to do with the US attempts to reset the relationship with Russia. 

China has an important import/export relationship with Iran — will they put pressure on Iran now that Russia seems willing to do so? 

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2 Comments »

  1. Given the UN’s structure, it’s hard to imagine them doing something productive given this situation. Unfortunately, I just can’t see Israel biting its tongue forever. Oh boy … what a mess.

    Comment by afrankangle — September 30, 2009 @ 3:29 pm | Reply

    • Frank this is a real mess.

      Israel is the only Jewish state in the middle of several Muslim nations. When the UN decided to send European Jews to then Palestine and establish The State of Israel in 1948 it was a bad idea. It still is.

      Since Texas wants to secede from the United States we should let them go wherever they want to go and give Texas to the Jews and make it the new Israel.

      How can there ever be peace in the region. Even if it’s peaceful times the Israelis are always going to be paranoid because of their location.

      If Israel is trigger happy and fires at Iran because they think Iran will one day have nuclear weapons we are all in trouble and eventually Israel will cease to exist in the Middle East because if they have 10 countries firing at them someone is going to get them and devastate the country.

      Israel depends on citizens from America and Europe to travel there and work in many of their industries and they depend on American Jews traveling there and joining the military to sustain their forces. If they are being fired on most of the business people from around the world will not travel there and it will cause them great financial harm. How will they then financially support this war if it starts?

      If Israel fires at Iran it will unite all the Muslim countries — even Muslims who are enemies amongst themselves today will unite. It will be viewed as a war against Muslims and a real, real, real war that will last for decades will break out in the Middle East.

      If America gets involved then Russia may feel obligated to get involved since they have business and other Russian interests in the Middle East. China might decide to get involved as well – I don’t want to see a million Chinese soldiers marching anywhere but in China.

      If China and Russia is involved in the Middle East then Great Britain, France and Germany will become involved.

      It’s a mess. We should just turn Texas into Israel and call it a day.

      Comment by Paulette — September 30, 2009 @ 3:57 pm | Reply


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